THE 10 BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING

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BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING You never know what stretches to do, how to do them, and why to do them after a good workout. Here are our 10 best stretches that will allow you to gain mobility, preserve your muscles, avoid injuries and simply feel good!

WHY DO WE HAVE TO STRETCH?

There are several schools. Some people think that post-workout stretches are harmful, while others think they are essential. So what is the real answer?

CASES WHERE STRETCHING IS DONE AFTER TRAINING

When you exercise, you put stress on your muscles that will tend to remain contracted. A contracted muscle is a muscle that is shortened. After training, it may be good to reset these tensions by stretching slowly for 15-20 seconds. You prevent in the long term that your muscles do not become too stiff by your training.

So do not try to relax, that is, try to gain amplitude. Indeed, extensive stretching also causes damage to your muscles. Stretching a muscle that has just overworked can, therefore, promote an injury. In this case, it is better to do stretching later in the day or another day.

INCREASE YOUR RANGE OF MOTION

If you want to learn how to do the splits or be able to touch your feet due to a shortening of your hamstrings, it may be good to do stretching sessions. You can take the time to stretch your muscles longer: about one minute of static stretching per muscle group/position that you can repeat 3 times.

PASSIVE, ACTIVE, DYNAMIC STRETCH, WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

STATIC OR PASSIVE STRETCHING

These are the most popular stretching exercises for the general public. It involves taking a gentle stretching posture and holding it for a few seconds. It is important to maintain the final stretching position between 15 and 20 seconds minimum, the time the myotatic reflex dissipates and the fibers can stretch.

(The myotatic reflex is basically a defense contraction of your muscle when your body detects an abnormal stretch.) In contracting, the muscle stops stretching.

In passive stretching, breathing plays an important role. Fast breathing increases the tone of your muscles, preventing you from stretching well. Slow and deep breathing promotes relaxation. You will be able to improve in flexibility, but remember that this flexibility will be static, not necessarily useful for an athlete who has functional flexibility needs, that is to say, flexibility related to strength and reactivity of your muscles.

ACTIVE STRETCHING FOR FUNCTIONAL FLEXIBILITY

For you to understand, here is a concrete case. You can have excellent flexibility of the hamstrings (back of the thigh) when you are lying on the ground and you bring an extended leg to your chest. Now, if this same person is standing up and trying to raise his leg to reach the same position as when she is lying down, chances are she will not succeed. His only way will eventually be to use momentum to get there. So she does not have the strength of her flexibility. To have the strength of its flexibility, it is power, in this case, to lift his leg extended by controlling the rise.

An active stretch is a movement in which the agonist muscle contracts while the antagonist’s muscle stretches. Once the stretching limit of the antagonist is reached, the stretch is continued by exerting a slight pull (or pressure) so as to increase the amplitude of the movement by 10%.

For example, lying on your back, you will bring one of your legs gently stretched vertically (the muscles of the quadriceps, the psoas and the iliac contract, the muscles of the hamstrings and the lower back are stretched). Once you reach the limit, you will gently pull your leg (with the hand or elastic) to increase the stretch by about 10% for 2 seconds. Then you will relax and start again 6 to 12 times.

DYNAMIC STRETCHING

They have an injury prevention role if they are properly performed. They help refine muscle reflexes so that they trigger at the right time with the right intensity. If you are looking for more flexibility, you can simply leave them out.

For example, you can swing a leg back and forth by gradually increasing the speed and amplitude during each repetition.

THE 10 STRETCHES TO BE FAVORED IN GENERAL

For the moment, we will be content with passive stretching that will be sufficient at first.

HAMSTRING STRETCHING

Stiffness in the back of the thigh can lead to injuries during a sport with moving and changing direction, as well as causing a backache.

Sit down, stick one foot to your thigh, straighten up by inflating your chest to keep your back straight. Then lower your bust gradually towards your leg.

Hold the final position making sure to breathe for 25 seconds. Reassemble and redo the movement 2 times before changing the legs.

STRETCHING OF THE ILIOPSOAS
Hamstring stretching

QUADRICEPS STRETCHING

For this stretching of the thighs, you can either do it in a standing position (better if you have knee problems), or in a sitting position, in this case, it will be necessary to provide a cushion to rest your knee (it is not visible on the photo but it was still painful!)

Grab your ankle with your hand then pull to bring it closer to your buttocks. To feel the stretch better, squeeze your buttocks to push your hips forward and bring your knee back.

QUADRICEPS STRETCHING
Stretching of the standing quadriceps
QUADRICEPS STRETCHING
Stretching of the standing quadriceps

STRETCHING OF THE ILIOPSOAS

Another important stretch to do! Place yourself in a lunge position, then push your hips forward and down so you feel the stretch at the hip!

STRETCHING OF THE ILIOPSOAS

STRETCHING OF THE GLUTES

Bring the right heel to the left buttock, pass the left foot over the right knee and hold the knee with the right forearm. Seek to self-grow and hold the stretch for 25 seconds then change.

BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING
STRETCHING OF THE GLUTES

TRICEPS STRETCHING

On your knees or standing, raise your right arm, bend it, then bring it with your left hand. Also, remember to straighten your head and self-grow. Hold for 25 seconds then switch sides.

BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING
TRICEPS STRETCHING

BICEP STRETCHING

Extend your arm in front of you then help yourself from your opposite arm to pull your finger and wrist back. Hold the position for 25 seconds then change.

BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING
BICEP STRETCHING

SHOULDER STRETCHING

Bring your left arm in front of you. With the other arm, place your left arm against your chest. Then lower your left shoulder and lean your head to the right to accentuate the stretching of the shoulder and your neck. Hold for 25 seconds and switch sides. BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING

BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING

CALF STRETCHING

Some people have very stiff calves, which can prevent good mobility of the ankle, prevent you from doing squats properly but it can also hurt you on dynamic sports.
Place your hands against a wall, back your leg to stretch back and put the heel on the ground. While keeping your heel stuck to the ground, flex your front leg to further stretch your calf. Hold for 25 seconds and switch sides. BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING

BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING
CALF STRETCHING

BACK STRETCHING

Stand on your knees and enough on your heels. Bring your head to the ground and stretch your arms in front of you. After 25 seconds of holding, you can place your 2 hands to the right enough for your left side to stretch. Then change sides. BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING

BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING
BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING
BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING

PECTORAL STRETCHING

A little rarer but interesting to avoid having too many shoulders pull forward and improve his posture. You must grab the edge of a wall with your hand that you place at shoulder height. Then you rotate your bust outward to feel the stretch. BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING

BEST STRETCHES AFTER TRAINING
PECTORAL STRETCHING

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